Difficulties For Pet Owners Renting


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pet owners renting

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Pets are not only a great companion for children, but also for adults, elderly persons and disabled people too. With them, you travel, build relationships, share your experiences and have memorable fun that stays in your mind forever. They don’t judge you for the colour of your skin, sexual orientation, religious beliefs and skills you may or may not have. They’re there. They are there for you, no matter what. Whether it’s a dog, a cat, a hamster or a rabbit, once your relationship is established, you can be sure you can always count on them. Mind you though, they expect the same things from you in return. 
 
 
From the very first time you take them home with you, you become their whole world. So time goes by, and the connection between you has become more solid, almost indispensable. You have put in so much effort to train your pet, as you did or would do with your own children, that now your pet is part of the family like the rest, no more, no less. 
 
 
In view of this, pet-owners still find difficulties being accepted by landlords, as if the fact that they’re not scientifically the blood of your blood means you can easily renounce them. Particularly, this issue arises when you search carefully and attentively for a house for rent. In most cases, attempts to convince your new potential landlord that your pet is well-trained and well-behaved, that furniture, doors and floor will not be damaged and that the neighbourhood will not even realise that a pet is living nearby, are made in vain. He will make a thousand excuses for not accepting your pet, but all of them do not really make any sense after all. 
 
 
He would tell you that dogs bark too much, cats sharpen their nails and rabbits bite pieces of wood. In return, you would tell him your pet is different. Your dog is quiet, your cat has its own tool to sharpen its nails and your rabbit stays on your bed when it’s not in the cage. How about the terrible and unbearable smell that they produce? You could say that that depends on the owner, how often he/she washes them and that if you go on the bus in the middle of July/August it seems that some people has run out of water in their houses. The point that landlords continuously miss here is that some people can have a stronger and more unpleasant smell than animals, children can scream louder than a dog barking and high heels can damage floors more than a bite of rabbit can. 
 
 
pet owners renting

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Therefore, if you are a landlord looking for tidy and clean tenants who can take good care of your house, do pay close attention to the behaviour and state of the pet which you are introduced to, in the same way that you would do with their owners. And if your first impression is not reliable enough, or if you like the tenants but not convinced100% about their pet, you can always offer them a three/six-months contract asa test; if they fail, they’re out. Simple as that. But if they meet yourexpectations, then it is the proof that a pet does not affect the way thattenants rent your place, and you may want their contract to be extended.

 

 

Be clear and straightforward. At the end of the day, pets are nothing but the owners’ reflections. They are what their owners want them to be. And if by chance you spot some damage to your house,the only ones to blame are the owners themselves. There is not much differencebetween choosing the right tenants and the right pets; you just need to be anintuitive and flexible landlord.

 

 

Clickhere to pick up some top tips for pet-owners looking to rent a property

 

Find out more aboutsaving money on estate agents fees when selling your home here

 

By Davide Purpura

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