Smart Meters


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Smart meters will save money save the environment and keep consumers better informed about the energy they are using in their homes. technology for smart meters is set to take off with mobile telephone applications and more advances in monitoring energy useage.People will be able to check their usage on the internet, or share tips for cutting bills on social networking websites.

What is a Smart Meter?

A smart meter is an advanced meter that identifies consumption in more detail than a conventional meter; and optionally, but generally, communicates that information via some network back to the local utility for monitoring and billing purposes.

Over the next 11 years every household in Britain will receive Smart Meters, one for gas and one for electricity. This project will be one of the largest infrastructure projects to have taken place since the Second World War. It will require a substantial investment as there ar

Perhaps most importantly, lower bills through lower energy consumption. Good for the wallet, great for the environment.
 
Smart Meters in Action
 

The Future of Smart Meters

The Department for Energy and Climate Change wants to see 47 million meters in 26 million properties by 2020.

John Moylan, BBC business reporter”The government had already announced that it wanted all UK homes to have smart meters by 2020. What is new today is that, following a consultation period, it has now decided how that will happen.

The main energy suppliers will be responsible for the roll-out.

This was the government’s preferred option, although there was a debate in the industry over whether it could be done another way, for example by the regional electricity distribution companies. The government has also outlined its early thinking on the buzzwords in the industry at the moment – smart grids.”

 

No more guesswork .

There have been thousands of complaints from householders who claim they have been overcharged on direct debit bills.
 
Consumer groups said this meant energy suppliers were getting free loans from customers. The regulator Ofgem told the companies to make charges clearer but said there was no “systematic” abuse of the direct debit system.

Smart meters should put this debate to bed, and would mean that householders no longer need to let the gasman in to read the meter.
People might even by able to check their usage on the internet, or share tips for cutting bills on social networking websites.

But installing these meters will be a big job. Some 26 million electricity and 22 million gas meters will need to be fitted.
 


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